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say more things are on the table than were before the election. the pessimist would say yeah, but there still isn't the substance of an agreement. >> the mechanics, i mean, what we have -- on the obama side, you have an election that pretty much, you know, they took as a mandate, if you will, where, you know, the very issue of taxes was sort of legislative, and the americans basically said they agreed with the president, saying that taxes need to rise on the wealthy. and then you have the right wing of the republican party who won also by wide margins in many deeply conservative districts. and they think they have a mandate. so in a way, it's like the two mandates are canceling each other out. they each think that they are -- and that is why we're frozen. i don't know if it's been that way -- i don't know if the mechanics have been such that it has been so polarized to the point where it's been paralyzing. >> where they feel like they've each won. >> it doesn't baffle me, it sort of angers me is that the conservative republicans who won by overwhelming margins in their distri
six-party partners. i would like to take this opportunity to sincerely congratulate president-elect park for her victory in south koreaest's hard-fought presidential election. the republic of korea is one of our nation's closest friends in asia. ours is a steadfast alliance forged in the crucible of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping
's presidential elections coming up in iran if you're a middle easterner, what do you do when it's campaign time? you pick fights with israel. >> clayton: and see that continue all year with the u.s. involvement there? >> it's going to have to. because israelis say iran has to have the program delayed by mid summertime. >> clayton: number two? >> there's no good option because you have assad the dictator butchering his people and rebels that are fighting him. they're not controlling what's happening on the ground, that's al-qaeda and the muslim brotherhood so the bloodshed as horrifying as it is now, wait till you see what happens. >> clayton: what about u.s. involvement in syria? there's been hand wringing whether we should get involved as in libya. i know there's movement to try to arm certain great news in syria, are we confident that's going in the right direction? >> no, because we've outsourced a lot of our role to countries like turkey and qatar and just like libya when you give them support on our behalf they support the islamists the people that we don't want to take over syria, without
there is a new prime minister in japan. he is shinzo abe, the japanese parliament elected him today five years after abe abruptly resigned from the job. he's japan's seventh prime minister in six years. alex reports from tokyo. >> reporter: a remarkable political comeback is now complete here in japan. shinzo abe is once again prime minister, elected in parliament on wednesday following his party's landslide victory in general elections earlier this month. he has now taken the reins and unveiled his cabinet as well, which includes former prime minister aso who is deputy prime minister as well as finance minister. as the 58-year-old abe returns to the top post he vacated in 2007, his to-do list this time is very long. front and center is the economy, which has sputtered along in japan for the better part of two decades and is in recession once again. many will be watching to see how abe handling heightened tensions with china, as the two countries spar over disputed islands, as well as north korea, which defied the international community recently launching a rocket that skirted japanese territ
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4